¢208 million will help to consolidate protected areas

A total of 11 conservation projects, which will be managed by five organizations received $ 416,000 (about ¢ 208 million) to support the Government with scientific information enable it to take decisions to protect biodiversity and tackling climate change.

Projects will be executed with funds from the II Pay Debt for Nature, an agreement between the United States and Costa Rica which forgives part of the debt that the country with its northern neighbor in exchange for investing those funds in forest conservation.

In a first payment, administered by the National Biodiversity Institute (INBio) in 2007, was allocated $ 26 million for projects to work on forest connectivity. At that time also funded 11 proposals in Osa, Chirripó and Tortuguero, among others.

For this second payment, the money is administered by the Forever Costa Rica and is destined to initiatives that help strengthen protected areas such as national parks and nature reserves.

The projects selected this year intend to develop tools that facilitate the management of biodiversity, climate change and management of protected areas, issues related to the goals of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

Those responsible for implementing these projects, over a maximum period of one year, are the INBio, the Center for Environmental Law and Natural Resources (Cedarena), the Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center (CATIE), the Tropical Science Center (CCT) and the Mesoamerican Center for Sustainable Development of the Dry Tropics (CEMEDE-A). The projects selected this year intend to develop tools that facilitate the management of biodiversity, climate change and management of protected areas, issues related to the goals of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

Those responsible for implementing these projects, over a maximum period of one year, are the INBio, the Center for Environmental Law and Natural Resources (Cedarena), the Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center (CATIE), the Tropical Science Center (CCT) and the Mesoamerican Center for Sustainable Development of the Dry Tropics (CEMEDE-A).

For example, the CEMEDE develop the area’s management plan protective of Miravalles in Guanacaste. Its proposal want to involve the community, academia and other social sectors to generate sustainable development.

Rigoberto Rodriguez, director of CEMEDE, said the main challenge of carrying out these projects is to “get people involved, and that the plan can be executed when we have the results, and collectively we want to build products that are useful for the country. ”

At the beginning of 2013 will open a new call for other organizations to obtain funding. The information is available in www.canjeporbosques.org.

Zdenka Piskulich, director of the Forever Costa Rica Association, said that in February 2013, will be a workshop with eligible entities and potential to train them in the presentation of projects, to join more organizations.

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